Hermosa Barcelona! Discover Barcelona's architecture

Topped by the wildly imaginative works of Antoni Gaudi, Barcelona is a living collage of architectural styles.

Though it’s most famous for modernist masterpieces, Barcelona is covered with architectural mega-attractions that are equally fascinating whether you’re an enthusiast or just want to get a feel for the city. Here’s our walkthrough of the top sights and areas.

Follow our guide to the exceptional architecture in Barcelona

Follow our guide to the exceptional architecture in Barcelona

Start in the Ciutat Vella

With La Rambla as its central thoroughfare, the obvious place to start your Barcelona architecture tour is in the Ciutat Vella, or old city.

This vibrant district comprises several smaller neighbourhoods – Barri Gotic (the Gothic Quarter), El Born, El Raval and La Barceloneta – each of which has its own distinct character, as well as a host of unmissable architectural gems.

Here you can walk a stretch of one of the best-preserved Roman walls in the world, next to Plaça de Ramon Berenguer el Gran, before delving into the labyrinthine streets to see the range of styles that define this enigmatic area.

From Gothic mansions and Romanesque churches to medieval markets and classical baroque palaces, there’s something to see on virtually every corner, and plenty of leafy plazas.

Highlights are numerous and often come down to personal taste, but there are undeniable showpieces no one should skip.

Vying for attention are Gaudi’s magnificent Palau Güell mansion and the Gothic, gargoyle-covered Barcelona Cathedral, as well as the grandiose Palau de la Música concert hall, regarded as one of the finest Modernista buildings in Barcelona. Other essential stops include the five Catalan-Gothic palazzos that make up the Museu Picasso, and the weird and wonderful Casa Bruno cuadros personalizados; a quirky art nouveau building on La Rambla adorned with decorative umbrellas and fans.

A view into the beautifully modern residential Eixample district

A view into the beautifully modern residential Eixample district

Modernisme in Eixample

To the north of the Plaça de Catalunya is the sprawling shopping and business district of Eixample, divided into two distinct sections by the elegant Passeig de Gràcia.

Laid out on a geometric grid system in the mid-19th century, it’s a much-studied example of considered urban planning, put in place as the city grew beyond the old medieval walls. During Eixample’s evolution various high-profile architects gave expression to their wildest ideas here, creating a neighbourhood-wide, open-air museum of Modernisme, also known as Catalan art nouveau.

For a definitive flavour of this unique style, head to the central section between Passeig de Sant Joan and Carrer Aribau, known as the Quadrat d’Or, or Golden Square. These breezy boulevards were the favoured spot of the well-to-do, who commissioned Barcelona’s foremost architectural minds to come up with elaborate homes.

Consequently you can see some of the greatest architecture in Barcelona here, including Gaudi’s dragon-roofed Casa Batlló, Puig i Cadafalch’s Casa Amatller, and Domènech i Montaner’s impressive Casa Lleó Morera; a trio collectively known as the Manzana de la Discordia, or the Block of Discord.

The Sagrada Familia

Of course, no visit to Eixample would be complete without a tour of its best-known building.

Gaudi’s landmark Sagrada Familia is probably the most famous work-in-progress in the world, and a symbol of the Barcelona skyline for more than a century. It’s still slated to be completed around the centenary of Gaudi’s death in 2026, though various land issues have prompted some commentators to speculate whether it will ever be finished at all.

Either way, it continues to astound and confound every visitor to Barcelona, and is one of the most extraordinary structures in Spain, if not the world.

Gaudi's La Sagrada Familia is the largest unfinished Roman Catholic Church in the world

Gaudi’s La Sagrada Familia is the largest unfinished Roman Catholic Church in the world

Contemporary architecture in Barcelona

Despite Barcelona’s major associations with Catalan art nouveau, the city is so much more than just Gaudi, and has always been at the forefront of architectural innovation. Its contemporary masterpieces include the striking Joan Miró Foundation building designed by Josep Lluís Sert, and Mies van der Rohe’s iconic German Pavilion constructed for the 1929 Barcelona International Exposition – now recreated as a replica next to the Magic Fountain of Montjuic.

More recent additions have helped to reinvigorate previously run-down parts of the city.

East of the Parc de la Ciutadella, the former working-class industrial neighbourhood of El Poblenou was once known as the ‘Manchester of the Mediterranean’. After most of its factories and warehouses closed it fell into a steep decline in the latter part of the 20th century, only to have new life breathed into it by a massive regeneration project, sparked by the announcement that Barcelona would host the Summer Olympics in 1992.

The Telefonica-Diagonal ZeroZero Tower at the innovation hub in District 22@

The Telefonica-Diagonal ZeroZero Tower at the innovation hub in District 22@

District 22@

As with many host cities, the Olympics triggered huge urban renewal, leading to the development of the 22@ innovation district, which has become a hotbed of sustainable and technology-led architecture.

Some of the most prominent new landmarks include the 38-storey Torre Glòries skyscraper (formerly known as the Torre Agbar), which, at 472ft tall, is Barcelona’s third-tallest building and similar in form to Norman Foster’s Gherkin in London. Next-door is the metal-clad Barcelona Museum of Design, which juts out over the Plaça de les Glòries, earning it the nickname ‘the stapler’ by locals.

Admittedly it’s a love-it or loathe-it kind of building, but whatever your view, the outstanding collections inside make it a must-visit destination for design lovers.

 

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Cuadras steps into PPV spotlight after loss to Chocolatito

Cuadras steps into PPV spotlight after loss to Chocolatito

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Although Carlos Cuadras lost his WBC 115-pound title in his last bout, he gained more fame and fortune than he ever got out of his first 36 unbeaten professional fights combined.

Cuadras is ready to cash in on his notoriety from his thrilling defeat against Roman “Chocolatito” Gonzalez, and he believes he’s headed straight toward a rematch with the pound-for-pound star.

Cuadras (35-1-1, 27 KOs) returned to Los Angeles on Thursday to promote his bout with David Carmona on the pay-per-view undercard of Gennady Golovkin’s middleweight title defense against Daniel Jacobs at Madison Square Garden next month.

FILE - In this Sept. 10, 2016, file photo, Carlos Cuadras, right, of Mexico, lands a punch against Roman Gonzalez, right, of Nicaragua, during a WBC Super Fl...

FILE – In this Sept. 10, 2016, file photo, Carlos Cuadras, right, of Mexico, lands a punch against Roman Gonzalez, right, of Nicaragua, during a WBC Super Flyweight Championship boxing match in Inglewood, Calif. Cuadras returned to Los Angeles on Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017, to promote his bout with David Carmona on the pay-per-view undercard of Gennady Golovkin¿s middleweight title defense against Daniel Jacobs at Madison Square Garden next month. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)

“It’s every fighter’s dream to be known worldwide,” Cuadras said through a translator. “I think I’m on my way.”

Cuadras was a world champion last September, but he was still a little-known Mexican super flyweight when he was chosen as the opponent for Gonzalez’s attempt to win a title in a fourth weight class at the Forum in Inglewood. Cuadras had fought just once before outside Mexico or Japan, where his promoter is based, and only hard-core U.S. or European fans had ever heard of him.

Gonzalez was widely expected to walk through Cuadras in his own debut as a U.S. headliner. Instead, the champion put up a furious fight before losing his belt by a narrow decision to Chocolatito, whose invincible aura was thoroughly punctured.

The swelling on Gonzalez’s face proved Cuadras could hang with the world’s best, and his ring showmanship and toughness immediately made him a name to remember.

“He stole the show at the Forum,” promoter Tom Loeffler said. “People didn’t know who he was, but they know now. It was his coming-out party.”

Loeffler has supplemented his main job as Golovkin’s promoter by finding and supporting a string of exciting fighters who had been missed by the boxing mainstream, just as Golovkin was before 2012. Gonzalez was barely known in the U.S. until Loeffler paired him with Golovkin on four undercards in recent years, turning the diminutive Nicaraguan star into a headliner who sold more than 6,700 seats at the Forum.

After watching Cuadras, Loeffler knew he had found another sellable, multilingual boxer with potential worldwide appeal. Cuadras’ English is passable, but he claims he speaks more Japanese from his years with Teiken Promotions.

While Gonzalez got the title last September, Cuadras also got an enormous boost. Fans greeted him at the airport on his return to Mexico City, and he immediately had enough name recognition to get his own showcase on an HBO pay-per-view card.

“I was really surprised how many people supported me,” Cuadras said. “It really felt like I won. It still hurts a little, but I know it helps in the long run.”

The winner of Cuadras’ bout with Carmona is likely to become the mandatory challenger for Gonzalez, who faces Thailand’s Srisaket Sor Rungvisa on the Golovkin-Jacobs card in New York.

Cuadras nearly went straight to a rematch with Gonzalez, but when talks stalled, he agreed to take on Carmona, his fellow Mexico City product. Cuadras is still annoyed to see Gonzalez facing Sor Rungvisa, who lost to Cuadras in 2014 before winning 14 straight fights in the last three years.

“I think (Gonzalez) knows he’s going to lose the rematch,” Cuadras said. “He knows I could knock him out. He understands that the next time we meet, it’s going to be Round 13. I’m going to pick up right where I left off.”

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Gonzalez wins slugfest with Cuadras, becomes 4-weight champ

Gonzalez wins slugfest with Cuadras, becomes 4-weight champ

INGLEWOOD, Calif. (AP) — Roman Gonzalez observed the raucous scene in the ring through swollen eyes. His battered ears absorbed the cheers from thousands of fans celebrating his arrival at the apex of Nicaragua’s boxing history.

Chocolatito had to put in 12 rounds of punishing work for his latest world title, which only made it all the sweeter.

Gonzalez won a championship in his fourth weight class Saturday night, taking a unanimous decision over Carlos Cuadras to claim the WBC 115-pound belt at the Forum.

Roman Gonzalez, left, of Nicaragua, lands a punch on Mexican champion Carlos Cuadras during a WBC super flyweight championship boxing match, Saturday, Sept. ...

Roman Gonzalez, left, of Nicaragua, lands a punch on Mexican champion Carlos Cuadras during a WBC super flyweight championship boxing match, Saturday, Sept. 10, 2016, in Inglewood, Calif. Gonzalez won a world championship in his fourth weight class, taking a unanimous decision over Cuadras to claim the WBC 115-pound title belt. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

The Nicaraguan pound-for-pound star better known by his nickname persevered through a brutal slugfest with Cuadras, who was outstanding on the biggest stage of his career. The fighters traded big shots and frenetic flurries all night, but Chocolatito’s remarkable skills earned the victory on all three judges’ cards: 117-111, 116-112 and 115-113.

“It was a very difficult fight,” Gonzalez said through a translator. “It was complicated. We both came in with great conditioning. This is the most difficult fight I’ve had.”

The Associated Press also scored it 115-113 as Gonzalez (46-0) surpassed his mentor, Alexis Arguello, by becoming the first Nicaraguan to win titles in four divisions. Gonzalez landed 322 total punches to Cuadras’ 257, but both fighters connected on 36 percent of their power shots.

Gonzalez acknowledged he had been thoroughly tested by Cuadras (35-1-1), who fearlessly took the star’s biggest shots in a name-making performance.

“(Gonzalez) is relentless,” Cuadras said. “He just wouldn’t stop all night. He never got tired. It’s all night long. I felt that I did enough to win the fight. I hit him more tonight than he’s ever been hit, and he kept coming, but I felt like his defense was better than I expected.”

Japan’s Yoshihiro Kamegai also stopped Mexico’s Jesus Soto Karass after the eighth round on the undercard, winning a rematch of their entertaining draw five months ago. Deep into another physical bout, Kamegai (27-3-2, 24 KOs) finally wobbled Soto Karass (28-11-4) with a big right hand in the eighth, and his corner waved off the fight before the ninth round began.

The vociferous crowd of 6,714 at the famed arena was thoroughly warmed up for the main event, sending alternating chants of “Nicaragua!” and “Mexico!” echoing through the rafters.

Gonzalez appeared to lose none of his power or speed when he moved up 3 pounds from flyweight to super flyweight. He attacked Cuadras from the opening moments with relentless combinations, pressuring with his usual stellar footwork and movement.

But Cuadras replied with toughness and flair, shuffling his feet to taunt Gonzalez in the middle rounds. He repeatedly caught Chocolatito with creative shots while Gonzalez relentlessly stalked the champion.

Blood began dripping from a cut near Cuadras’ right eye in the ninth round, but Chocolatito’s face swelled on the right side in the late rounds. Wearing more damage than he has incurred in several recent fights combined, Gonzalez still had a smile when he claimed his next belt.

The 29-year-old Gonzalez has assumed a spot among the top pound-for-pound fighters in boxing during a steady rise through the lightest weight classes. He moved into the U.S. spotlight in his last three bouts by fighting in the co-main events of shows starring Gennady Golovkin, the unbeaten middleweight champion.

With Golovkin fighting Kell Brook in London on Saturday, Gonzalez assumed the headlining role at the Forum — and he was ready for the spotlight.

Gonzalez wanted the fourth title to avenge Alexis Arguello, the most accomplished boxer in Nicaragua’s history and a longtime mentor to Gonzalez before his death in 2009. Arguello fell just short of a title in a fourth weight class during two memorable losses to Aaron Pryor 34 years ago.

“I will never be better than Arguello,” Gonzalez said. “He is the teacher. I am his son. He will always be number one.”

Roman Gonzalez, left, of Nicaragua, connects to Mexican champion Carlos Cuadras during a WBC Super Flyweight Championship boxing match, Saturday, Sept. 10, 2...

Roman Gonzalez, left, of Nicaragua, connects to Mexican champion Carlos Cuadras during a WBC Super Flyweight Championship boxing match, Saturday, Sept. 10, 2016, in Inglewood, Calif. Gonzalez won a world championship in his fourth weight class Saturday night, taking a unanimous decision over Cuadras to claim the WBC 115-pound title belt. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

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Nissan banks on after-sales 'hyper-personalization' revenue

Nissan banks on after-sales ‘hyper-personalization’ revenue

YOKOHAMA, Japan (AP) — Nissan is going to offer internet access, safety technology and myriad accessory options the Japanese automaker calls “hyper-personalization,” not only in new models but also for vehicles people already own.

That means more than access to the music or seat colors of your choice.

Advances in 3-D printing, for instance, will make possible all kinds of designs for your car, based on practically anything, such as Pokemon or images of your children, similar to how people can customize their sneaker today, Nissan Motor Co. Corporate Vice President Kent O’Hara, who oversees the after-sales business, said Tuesday.

Nissan Motor Co. Corporate Vice President Kent O'Hara smiles after a round table meeting at its headquarters in Yokohama, near Tokyo, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016....

Nissan Motor Co. Corporate Vice President Kent O’Hara smiles after a round table meeting at its headquarters in Yokohama, near Tokyo, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016. Nissan is going to offer internet access, safety technology and myriad accessory options the Japanese automaker calls “hyper-personalization,” not only in new models but also for vehicles people already own, said O’Hara, who oversees the after-sales business. (AP Photo/Yuri Kageyama)

O’Hara is projecting that his division’s efforts in connectivity, accessories and personalization will deliver 25 percent of company’s after-sales revenue by 2022, when it’s negligible now.

Advances in such fields are accelerating in the industry, and Nissan hopes to be ahead of rivals.

“Nissan wants to take it further,” O’Hara told reporters at headquarters in Yokohama, southwest of Tokyo.

Devices to connect cars to the net will be offered at dealers, first in Japan and India, expanding to other countries through 2020, he said, stressing that such needs are great in emerging markets, as well as the U.S. and Europe.

Connected cars will allow vehicles’ service needs to be closely monitored and forecast so consumers will be able to get parts at their dealers ahead of time, said O’Hara.

Although hyper-personalization appears to counter the recent moves away from ownership, such as car-sharing, O’Hara argued tailoring vehicles will continue to be in demand, regardless of whether they’re owned or shared.

O’Hara acknowledged uncertainties about what the future might hold as such changes have just begun to unfold. But he said a third of Nissan cars on the roads will become connected in the next several years, with that figure rising when including new models.

Nissan Chief Executive Carlos Ghosn has said the global auto industry will undergo more changes in the next five years than it has over the last two decades, with the arrival of connected cars, autonomous driving and infotainment.

___

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Bolivian inmates spark riot after a prisoner died of the coronavirus

Prisoners at an overcrowded jail in Bolivia started a riot and set objects on fire while chanting ‘freedom’ after an inmate died from the coronavirus.

Authorities have reported more than 60 deaths due to the coronavirus in Bolivia’s prison system, which is overcrowded at more than 240 per cent capacity.  

Monday’s massive protest shook four most populated prisons in the Andean nation’s Cochabamba region.

Dozens of inmates at the San Sebastián detention facility were demanding improved access to medical care.

‘We were surprised today with a protest, with a riot carried out by the inmates,’ said San Sebastián prison warden, Simón Cuadros, according to

Inmates protest on the rooftop of the San Sebastián prison in Cochabamba, Bolivia, on Monday to demand better medical care after a detainee at the jail died from the coronavirus

Inmates protest on the rooftop of the San Sebastián prison in Cochabamba, Bolivia, on Monday to demand better medical care after a detainee at the jail died from the coronavirus

Prisoners rioted at one of the four most overpopulated jails in Bolivia on Monday after an inmate died of COVID-19

Prisoners rioted at one of the four most overpopulated jails in Bolivia on Monday after an inmate died of COVID-19

Inmates protest on the rooftop of the San Sebastian prison in Bolivia on Monday

Inmates protest on the rooftop of the San Sebastian prison in Bolivia on Monday

Local media showed images of inmates climbing to the roofs of the prisons, calling for medicine and access to doctors as families camped out side in support of their relatives.

‘We urge the entry of medical teams to do an evaluation inside the prison facilities to prevent more deaths,’ said Cochabamba ombudsman Nelson Cox.

Eight inmates in Cochabamba have reportedly died of COVID-19, according to Cox. 

Concerns have risen over the virus spreading throughout the prison population.

‘There are no doctors, there are no medicines. They are dying inside,’ said Susana, a relative of a prisoner in the San Sebastián prison who declined to give her last name. ‘It is not possible to let them die. We are human beings.’ 

Inmates briefly took over the San Sebastián jail in Cochabamba, Bolivia, after the death of a prisoner due to the coronavirus

Inmates briefly took over the San Sebastián jail in Cochabamba, Bolivia, after the death of a prisoner due to the coronavirus

The San Sebastián prison was built to hold 200 inmates but currently has some 650 detainees

The San Sebastián prison was built to hold 200 inmates but currently has some 650 detainees

The San Sebastián prison was built to hold 200 inmates but currently has some 650 detainees. 

There have been several other inmate deaths in recent months that were not confirmed as caused by the coronavirus due to a lack of testing. 

Data from John Hopkins University that was published Monday showed Latin America is the most infected region in the world 4,381,402 confirmed coronavirus cases. 

The region placed four countries among the top 10 nations with COVID-19 cases.

Bolivia ranks eighth in Latin America with 71,181 coronavirus cases. The virus has killed 2,647 people in the country.

Cochabamba is the third region most affected by the pandemic in Bolivia with 7,544 infections and 583 deaths. 

The eastern city of Santa Cruz has been severely impacted with 17,873 confirmed cases and 412 deaths. La Paz, the Bolivian capital, has reported with 2,882 cases and 76 deaths.

Authorities have reported more than 60 deaths due to the coronavirus in Bolivia's prison system, which is overcrowded at more than 240 per cent capacity

Authorities have reported more than 60 deaths due to the coronavirus in Bolivia’s prison system, which is overcrowded at more than 240 per cent capacity

The coronavirus death of an inmate at the San Sebastián prison in Cochabamba, Bolivia, sparked a riot on Monday

The coronavirus death of an inmate at the San Sebastián prison in Cochabamba, Bolivia, sparked a riot on Monday

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Bolivian inmates spark riot after a prisoner died of the coronavirus

Prisoners at an overcrowded jail in Bolivia started a riot and set objects on fire while chanting ‘freedom’ after an inmate died from the coronavirus.

Authorities have reported more than 60 deaths due to the coronavirus in Bolivia’s prison system, which is overcrowded at more than 240 per cent capacity.  

Monday’s massive protest shook four most populated prisons in the Andean nation’s Cochabamba region.

Dozens of inmates at the San Sebastián detention facility were demanding improved access to medical care.

‘We were surprised today with a protest, with a riot carried out by the inmates,’ said San Sebastián prison warden, Simón Cuadros, according to

Inmates protest on the rooftop of the San Sebastián prison in Cochabamba, Bolivia, on Monday to demand better medical care after a detainee at the jail died from the coronavirus

Inmates protest on the rooftop of the San Sebastián prison in Cochabamba, Bolivia, on Monday to demand better medical care after a detainee at the jail died from the coronavirus

Prisoners rioted at one of the four most overpopulated jails in Bolivia on Monday after an inmate died of COVID-19

Prisoners rioted at one of the four most overpopulated jails in Bolivia on Monday after an inmate died of COVID-19

Inmates protest on the rooftop of the San Sebastian prison in Bolivia on Monday

Inmates protest on the rooftop of the San Sebastian prison in Bolivia on Monday

Local media showed images of inmates climbing to the roofs of the prisons, calling for medicine and access to doctors as families camped out side in support of their relatives.

‘We urge the entry of medical teams to do an evaluation inside the prison facilities to prevent more deaths,’ said Cochabamba ombudsman Nelson Cox.

Eight inmates in Cochabamba have reportedly died of COVID-19, according to Cox. 

Concerns have risen over the virus spreading throughout the prison population.

‘There are no doctors, there are no medicines. They are dying inside,’ said Susana, a relative of a prisoner in the San Sebastián prison who declined to give her last name. ‘It is not possible to let them die. We are human beings.’ 

Inmates briefly took over the San Sebastián jail in Cochabamba, Bolivia, after the death of a prisoner due to the coronavirus

Inmates briefly took over the San Sebastián jail in Cochabamba, Bolivia, after the death of a prisoner due to the coronavirus

The San Sebastián prison was built to hold 200 inmates but currently has some 650 detainees

The San Sebastián prison was built to hold 200 inmates but currently has some 650 detainees

The San Sebastián prison was built to hold 200 inmates but currently has some 650 detainees. 

There have been several other inmate deaths in recent months that were not confirmed as caused by the coronavirus due to a lack of testing. 

Data from John Hopkins University that was published Monday showed Latin America is the most infected region in the world 4,381,402 confirmed coronavirus cases. 

The region placed four countries among the top 10 nations with COVID-19 cases.

Bolivia ranks eighth in Latin America with 71,181 coronavirus cases. The virus has killed 2,647 people in the country.

Cochabamba is the third region most affected by the pandemic in Bolivia with 7,544 infections and 583 deaths. 

The eastern city of Santa Cruz has been severely impacted with 17,873 confirmed cases and 412 deaths. La Paz, the Bolivian capital, has reported with 2,882 cases and 76 deaths.

Authorities have reported more than 60 deaths due to the coronavirus in Bolivia's prison system, which is overcrowded at more than 240 per cent capacity

Authorities have reported more than 60 deaths due to the coronavirus in Bolivia’s prison system, which is overcrowded at more than 240 per cent capacity

The coronavirus death of an inmate at the San Sebastián prison in Cochabamba, Bolivia, sparked a riot on Monday

The coronavirus death of an inmate at the San Sebastián prison in Cochabamba, Bolivia, sparked a riot on Monday

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Nissan banks on after-sales 'hyper-personalization' revenue

Nissan banks on after-sales ‘hyper-personalization’ revenue

YOKOHAMA, Japan (AP) — Nissan is going to offer internet access, safety technology and myriad accessory options the Japanese automaker calls “hyper-personalization,” not only in new models but also for vehicles people already own.

That means more than access to the music or seat colors of your choice.

Advances in 3-D printing, for instance, will make possible all kinds of designs for your car, based on practically anything, such as Pokemon or images of your children, similar to how people can customize their sneaker today, Nissan Motor Co. Corporate Vice President Kent O’Hara, who oversees the after-sales business, said Tuesday.

Nissan Motor Co. Corporate Vice President Kent O'Hara smiles after a round table meeting at its headquarters in Yokohama, near Tokyo, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016....

Nissan Motor Co. Corporate Vice President Kent O’Hara smiles after a round table meeting at its headquarters in Yokohama, near Tokyo, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016. Nissan is going to offer internet access, safety technology and myriad accessory options the Japanese automaker calls “hyper-personalization,” not only in new models but also for vehicles people already own, said O’Hara, who oversees the after-sales business. (AP Photo/Yuri Kageyama)

O’Hara is projecting that his division’s efforts in connectivity, accessories and personalization will deliver 25 percent of company’s after-sales revenue by 2022, when it’s negligible now.

Advances in such fields are accelerating in the industry, and Nissan hopes to be ahead of rivals.

“Nissan wants to take it further,” O’Hara told reporters at headquarters in Yokohama, southwest of Tokyo.

Devices to connect cars to the net will be offered at dealers, first in Japan and India, expanding to other countries through 2020, he said, stressing that such needs are great in emerging markets, as well as the U.S. and Europe.

Connected cars will allow vehicles’ service needs to be closely monitored and forecast so consumers will be able to get parts at their dealers ahead of time, said O’Hara.

Although hyper-personalization appears to counter the recent moves away from ownership, such as car-sharing, O’Hara argued tailoring vehicles will continue to be in demand, regardless of whether they’re owned or shared.

O’Hara acknowledged uncertainties about what the future might hold as such changes have just begun to unfold. But he said a third of Nissan cars on the roads will become connected in the next several years, with that figure rising when including new models.

Nissan Chief Executive Carlos Ghosn has said the global auto industry will undergo more changes in the next five years than it has over the last two decades, with the arrival of connected cars, autonomous driving and infotainment.

___

Follow Yuri Kageyama on Twitter at website style=”font-size:1.2em;”>Her work can be found at website

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Nissan banks on after-sales 'hyper-personalization' revenue

Nissan banks on after-sales ‘hyper-personalization’ revenue

YOKOHAMA, Japan (AP) — Nissan is going to offer internet access, safety technology and myriad accessory options the Japanese automaker calls “hyper-personalization,” not only in new models but also for vehicles people already own.

That means more than access to the music or seat colors of your choice.

Advances in 3-D printing, for instance, will make possible all kinds of designs for your car, based on practically anything, such as Pokemon or images of your children, similar to how people can customize their sneaker today, Nissan Motor Co. Corporate Vice President Kent O’Hara, who oversees the after-sales business, said Tuesday.

Nissan Motor Co. Corporate Vice President Kent O'Hara smiles after a round table meeting at its headquarters in Yokohama, near Tokyo, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016....

Nissan Motor Co. Corporate Vice President Kent O’Hara smiles after a round table meeting at its headquarters in Yokohama, near Tokyo, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016. Nissan is going to offer internet access, safety technology and myriad accessory options the Japanese automaker calls “hyper-personalization,” not only in new models but also for vehicles people already own, said O’Hara, who oversees the after-sales business. (AP Photo/Yuri Kageyama)

O’Hara is projecting that his division’s efforts in connectivity, accessories and personalization will deliver 25 percent of company’s after-sales revenue by 2022, when it’s negligible now.

Advances in such fields are accelerating in the industry, and Nissan hopes to be ahead of rivals.

“Nissan wants to take it further,” O’Hara told reporters at headquarters in Yokohama, southwest of Tokyo.

Devices to connect cars to the net will be offered at dealers, first in Japan and India, expanding to other countries through 2020, he said, stressing that such needs are great in emerging markets, as well as the U.S. and Europe.

Connected cars will allow vehicles’ service needs to be closely monitored and forecast so consumers will be able to get parts at their dealers ahead of time, said O’Hara.

Although hyper-personalization appears to counter the recent moves away from ownership, such as car-sharing, O’Hara argued tailoring vehicles will continue to be in demand, regardless of whether they’re owned or shared.

O’Hara acknowledged uncertainties about what the future might hold as such changes have just begun to unfold. But he said a third of Nissan cars on the roads will become connected in the next several years, with that figure rising when including new models.

Nissan Chief Executive Carlos Ghosn has said the global auto industry will undergo more changes in the next five years than it has over the last two decades, with the arrival of connected cars, autonomous driving and infotainment.

___

Follow Yuri Kageyama on Twitter at website style=”font-size:1.2em;”>Her work can be found at website

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